SURRY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN UPDATE BRIEF SUMMARY

 

RECENT TRENDS

 

¨      Surry’s year-round population increased by 36 percent between 1990 and 2000, from 1,004 to 1,361.   This was a faster rate than predicted in the 1991 comprehensive plan.

 

¨      The town’s population probably at least doubles in the summer months.

 

¨      Further year-round population growth is likely.  While there is no reliable way to predict what will happen, a growth rate of about 32 percent between 2000 and 2015 is projected.

 

¨      While the median age in Hancock County as a whole increased during the 1990s, the median age for Surry actually decreased slightly from 39.2 years in 1990 to 38.4 years in 2000.  This means that the town is attracting younger families as well as retirees.

 

¨      Between 1990 and 2000, the number of year-round homes increased by 32 percent from 437 to 575.  The number of second homes increased by 4 percent from 325 to 338.

 

¨      By the year 2015, at least 775 year-round homes are expected in Surry.

 

¨      Surry has a slightly lower unemployment rate than the county average and a median household income that is almost 18 percent higher than the county average.

 

¨      The greater Ellsworth area has median home sales prices that are 16 percent higher than the state median.  While no firm data are available, prices in Surry appear to be even higher.

 

¨      Traffic in town is increasing.  State-sponsored traffic counts show that the average annual daily traffic on the Newbury Neck Road increased by 57 percent between 1991 and 1998 (from 450 to 710 vehicles).  On Route 172 at the Route 176 intersection, traffic increased from 3,290 in 1991 to 4,430 in 1996, a 32 percent increase. 

 

¨      The state equalized valuation increased by 45 percent between 1993 and 2002, while the tax commitment increased by 74 percent during the same time period.  This means that tax spending is increasing at a faster rate than property values.

 

 

MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS

 

¨      Revise town land use ordinances to allow duplexes and multifamily units in the village area if water supply and wastewater disposal arrangements meet state standards.  Allow accessory (in-law) apartments and dwellings in all zones where allowed by state law.

 

¨      Undertake a comprehensive village improvement program to address landscaping, sidewalk, bicycle facilities and stormwater drainage needs.

 

¨      Allow agricultural and horticultural uses in all zones where allowed by state law and allow such uses to have up to a 60 percent lot coverage in the village area.

 

¨      Expand recreational facilities by creating an outdoor skating facility, continuing improvements to the Osgood lot and upgrading the school ball fields.

 

¨      Work with state agencies to restore alewife fisheries in Surry.

 

¨      Supports the expansion/replacement of the municipal building/fire station.

 

¨      Work with county-wide groups to take measures to protect the town’s water bodies from invasive species.

 

¨      Revise the town’s land use ordinances to implement the standards shown in the table below.

 

 

Summary of Proposed District Standards, Surry

District

Minimum Residential Lot Size

Road Frontage

Maximum Cul-de-sac length

Multi-family allowed

Commercial Forest and Ag

Mobile Home Parks allowed

Residential

20,000 ft2

100 ft.

1,500 ft.

Y

Y

Y

Roadside commercial

1 acre

200 ft

1,500 ft

Y

Y

Y

Village

20,000 ft2

100 ft

1,500 ft 

Y

Y

N

Transitional

40,000 ft2

150 ft

1,500 ft

N

N

N

Rural

4 acres

200 ft

1,000 ft

N

Y

N

Resource Protection

40,000 ft2

150 ft

1,000 ft

N

N

N

Stream Protection

40,000 ft2

150 ft

1,000 ft

N

N

N